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Research Reports
As of June 24, 2018

Improving Combined Time-Cost Forecasting Capabilities for Contractor

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Contractors must carefully manage cash outflow (e.g. for materials to enable their work) and inflow (after the work) to be profitable, especially in the current economy. The importance of cash flow for business success is undisputed, as bankruptcies due to insufficient cash flow underline.

T&D Worksite Shock Protection Strategies

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The electric power industry has long recognized the need to protect workers aloft and on the ground from dangerous voltages that can occur during construction and maintenance operations on overhead transmission and distribution (T&D) lines.

Effectively Recruiting and Retaining Field Supervisors and Project Managers

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To effectively retain field supervisors, a formal plan-which should include a recruitment plan, a training plan, an induction process, a career development plan, and a motivational strategy-is required.

Fuel Cell Technology and Electrical Contracting, A Financial Analysis of the Fuel Cell Life Cycle

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The purpose of this report is to conduct a financial analysis of the fuel cell life cycle in order to determine when market entry may occur. The analysis has been performed on the life cycle of a 200 kW fuel cell unit, including initial costs, future energy savings and future costs.

The Future for Union Electrical Construction

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Leaders of union electrical construction, including organized contractors, are creating their future. Decisions taken and actions initiated today may well determine whether the industry survives. Commonly held assumptions may not be useful in shaping a new future.

The Impact of Variation on Electrical Contractor Profitability

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Reduction of variation (or six-sigma operation) has helped many industries lower cost and improve productivity. By controlling variation in many aspects of their work, numerous industries have been able to stay competitive against international low-cost producers.

A Comparison of Operational Costs of Union vs. Non-Union Electrical Contractors

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This study was commissioned to investigate the main differences between unionized electrical contractors (ECs) and open-shop contractors, as well as to identify the main cost drivers and how they differ between the two. Throughout this study, we determine the impact of various cost drivers on union contractors.

The Effects of Absenteeism & Turnover on Labor Productivity for Electrical Contractors

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Labor costs for electrical contractors can reach 40 percent to 60 percent of total construction costs. With that much invested, contractors need a workforce that is both stable and productive. Our research has found two common problems that reduce productivity: absenteeism and turnover.

Establishing a Best Practices Program for Electrical Contractors

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Employees at all levels of management and labor spend a great deal of time and effort finding ways to improve their performance and the company’s performance.

Optimal Operational Model for Electrical Contractors

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The purpose of this research was to investigate the productivity improvement principles used in various industries and to suggest implementable models for use in the electrical construction industry. The research was very successful.

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